Museum Trends: More Diverse Exhibitions

58fe547e2600004500c47715.jpeg

Faith Ringgold (right) and Michele Wallace (left) in 1971. Image from the Huffington Post.

The first exhibition ever to showcase the work of exclusively black female artists was in 1971. Today the Brooklyn Museum is presenting We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women: 1965-1985, a new exhibition about black women artists of that time period. Those who participated in a movement to increase the visibility of black women artists from the 1960s to the 1980s aligned themselves with the black arts movement over the women’s liberation movement, as the latter was mostly led by white, middle-class women. The exhibition includes works from 40 artists who aimed to show the implications of being a woman artist of color.

Female artists are vastly underrepresented in museums in general, but especially when they are also black, which is why exhibitions like the Brooklyn Museum’s are so important. Efforts to increase the number of women artists, especially women of color, is a topic of discussion at many institutions.

To learn more about the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition, please visit: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/14-extraordinary-black-women-artists-are-now-on-view-in-brooklyn_us_58fe540de4b00fa7de16bfb3?ir=Arts&ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000030&section=us_arts.

To learn more about the lack of women artists in museum collections, please visit: https://www.apollo-magazine.com/inquiry-wall-flowers-women-historical-art-collections/.

Amy Shirer ’18

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s